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Zimbabwe

Saving lives and relieving suffering in Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe continues to experience the effects of El Niño-induced drought. Rainfall in late 2016 and early 2017 in most of the country left some districts on flood alert. The destabilising weather conditions have significantly affected the lives and livelihoods of people, especially in the southern region where food insecurity and malnutrition rates are some of the highest in the country.

More than a decade of economic decline has exacerbated the situation as most communities have experienced a drop in owner-produced stocks and more households which previously engaged in subsistence farming have resorted to market purchases. Poor water and sanitation facilities in both urban and rural areas increase the risk of diseases such as cholera and typhoid. Since International Medical Corps’ operations began in Zimbabwe in 2009, we have delivered quality health services, nutrition and food security programs and reduced the spread of waterborne diseases by increasing access to clean water and improving hygiene practices.

Nutrition and Food Security–Ration Distributions: International Medical Corps is implementing health and nutrition activities as part the Cultivating New Frontiers in Agriculture-led Development Food Assistance Program, known as Amalima. Our teams deliver monthly food rations at more than 75 primary and secondary distribution points to improve household food and nutrition security, targeting homes with pregnant and lactating women and children under two. Our teams are also distributing protective rations aimed at reducing intra-household sharing of the supplemental ration during lean season periods.

Healthy Harvest and other Trainings: Through a program known as Healthy Harvest, International Medical Corps trains community health workers on nutrition assessment, the causes of malnutrition, and the importance of producing healthy foods. These health workers pass on the Heathy Harvest approach and skills to field health officers and community care volunteers and garden groups, creating a cadre of more than 7,000 people, thus far, who have benefited from the training. We are also collaborating with the Ministry of Health to train health workers on integrated management of acute malnutrition.

Community Health Club Activities: As part of the Amalima program, our teams organise community-based facilitator meetings in each district to plan and conduct effective community health club activities aimed at youth engagement.

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH): Our WASH work focuses on community engagement and training of “pump minders” to improve management of water points and service delivery so people can access safe portable water from community boreholes.

Explore Zimbabwe

Our impact and work

TippyTap

'Tippy taps' become status symbols in rural Zimbabwe

'Tippy taps' become status symbols in rural Zimbabwe

'Tippy taps' become status symbols in rural Zimbabwe

Community health clubs are becoming fashionable in parts of rural Zimbabwe

Esnath

Rebuilding lives in Zimbabwe

Rebuilding lives in Zimbabwe

Rebuilding lives in Zimbabwe

Giving a strong woman back her independence.

We trained Richard Ndebele - and now he's passing his knowledge of childhood nutrition onto mothers

We trained Richard Ndebele - and now he's passing his knowledge of childhood nutrition onto mothers

Annah talks hygiene Zimbabwe

Simple hygiene skills save lives

Simple hygiene skills save lives

Protection for a community in Zimbabwe

How training in water, sanitation and hygiene is helping the San Community stop the spread of preventable diseases

Fixing water pipes Tile

Diary of an emergency

Diary of an emergency

Typhoid outbreak

Following a typhoid outbreak in Bindura City, Zimbabwe, in early 2012, International Medical Corps mobilized a comprehensive emergency response to stop the spread and ensure the response was sustainable.


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